Art in our Art 2: The Return of the Artist!

This is the second in a series of art talks with our painters. As you might have read, our game will feature paintings from acclaimed Croatian young artists. For example, when you enter Orville’s mansion, he has pictures hanging on his walls, from some of our finest fine artists (pun very much intended) as seen here:

Orville’s mansion features artwork from some of the best young Croatian painters – Tara Beata Racz and Luka Kusevic.

Today we interview Luka Kusevic, the painter behind the pictures you see in Badger Orville’s hallway in the gif above. Luka was born in 1993 in Zagreb where he finished the School of Applied Arts and after that the Academy of Fine Arts in the class of prof. Zoltan Novak. His work was exhibited in the Gallery of Matica Hrvatska (Matrix Croatica) as well as the 5th Biennale of Painting in HDLU last year, and may more.

5th Biennale of Painting – Luka showcasing his works

So, Luka, what attracts you to art?

The reason why I paint is because I am Fascinated by how dead matter (in this case – color) can produce something alive – a visual sensation. The contemplation done over a particular picture or other work can awaken unexpected horizons which throws a man out of his ordinary everyday life.

How about games, do you think they can also be art?

I’d agree with an older painter colleague that today’s view of art needs redefining because practically every witch doctor shaman today can proclaim themselves an artist. Art in general has lost the power of transcending its own pitiful “ego” – in other words, the ability to change the perception of a man from his sluggish viewpoint.

As for games, I think they transcend art – because the virtual perception of the video-game mixes with the everyday perceptions we bring ourselves. Games could be the future of the cyborg-man but it is clear that total assimilation into virtuality will not be attained, due to the arrogant way we treat our lives and bioms.

So how did you go about making the paintings for our game? What do you think of the game aesthetics in general?

https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/619813078636429322/695699068369764382/unknown.png
The Scurries impression by Luka

The biggest challenge was to translate my current ductus (or: my style of painting) to fit the form of a squirrel, beaver, and so on. What fascinated me with the Ark characters was their lucidity, the intelligence of dialogues. As for the visuals, everything is clear. The animals have the ability to create and move in spacetime – this is a world of the surreal, of fantasy… Visual elements should therefore be more dispersed. Not abstract, but definitely more fleeting. Man should be in a constant state of feeling that things are continually changing. If I were creating visuals for the entire game, I’d play with the light of the vegetation, the structures (mills and fortresses), I’d create visuals of bugs and bats to complicate things further. It is, for me, too simple – easy. I would personally take hints from the aesthetics of Monet or Rousseau.

Dabrovit impression by Luka

And for the last question – what are you doing aside from this?

I’m working on a series of large format paintings where I’m continuing to develop landscapes as a mental space. I want pictures to burn the inside of the man who watches them. So they extinguish themselves i let go to the sensation. Not neccessarily enjoy but at least for a moment to jump out of their own skin.

Charles’ father Herbert

And currently where can we experience your art?

Currently, I’m exhibiting on a group exhibition “U ljetnom kodu” (In the Summer Code) in the Kranjčar Gallery in Zagreb.

Great! Everyone from Zagreb – feel free to check it out!

Exploring the wastelands of the Animal Kingdom

Exploring the wastelands of the Animal Kingdom

Even though the environments we publish on our Facebook, Twitter and Instagram are often beautiful, lush, and “friendly”, some of those can be considered rather unhabitable and hostile.

We are talking about the wastelands Charles will explore in Trip the Ark Fantastic. As you may have seen in the “Mysteries of the Southern Continent”, Charles looks like he is embarking on an adventure through the jungle with his friends.

Looks pretty neat, right?

Well, this part of the game will require some navigation skills, as you’re going in an uncharted territory which is literally uncharted. There won’t be any maps guiding you to go up or down, right or left. You’re on your own.

The wastelands are a dangerous place. They used to be a lush forest, but have turned into a scorching desert in the last 1000 years. Charles, being a hedgehog, can’t survive in this blazing heat, but we’ll leave this part of the game to you, the player.

There is an interesting lore background for the wastelands.

Over 3000 years ago, the lions tried to usurp the hierarchy and failed which resulted in the usurper family being banished north over the mountains – which is considered a death sentence.

The so-called snowy wastelands. If you end-up there, well, good luck with that.

The usurper’s son Antimocles the Red was the father of Alexander the First who founded the Animal Kingdom. The split (and the harsher climate) made the lion’s rule weaker and in the following millenia they eroded from a powerful force that ruled over everyone in the southern territories to just a lion tribe in the caverns ruling over themselves with Nerva as Emperor.

After a couple of generations in the southern continent they decided to leave because they saw they could not prosper in the monkey civilisation which was thriving and they went over the land bridge to the northern continent and started subjugating the primitive cultures of smaller animals (rodents, birds et cetera).

After a few generations, they had built the Animal Kingdom that spanned the entire continent, subjugating also the great cats. Some animals were still very resistant because they weren’t used to living under the centralised rule and so after many generations, one lion family had invented the Ark myth after a failed bloody rebellion by other animals.

Following the change of the ruling branch, the myth was thought to be true even by the ruling lion family, and the way it was fabricated was lost to history.

By that time, the land bridge to the southern continent had already collapsed after centuries of diminishing because of the rising sea levels. The ice melted, which led to warming in temperature.

The warming in temperature made the barren wasteland Charles will have to pass.

What do you think, with Charles being a hedgehog, how can he pass through the wastelands? Let us know right in the comments below, or on our Facebook, Twitter, Insta, and Discord!

Gamechuck at Indie Arena Booth!

Gamechuck at Indie Arena Booth!

Even though there aren’t any physical conferences lately due to issues, there is going to be one this year! It’s even going to have booths – virtual booths! And Gamechuck has a virtual booth on it:

Here’s a sneak peak of one part of the booth with a large (plasma?) tv and arcade showcasing our upcoming title Speed Limit.

It’s the Indie Arena Booth, and you can see the Gamechuck page on IAB here for our game Speed Limit, but to take a virtual walk on the booth itself, you’ll have to wait for 27th of August when the event starts!

In case you didn’t know, IAB is an interactive digital place with a festival flair where independent game developers showcase their games. They attended multiple conventions in 2019, including gamescom and MAG Erfurt. Their mission is giving the best opportunities to reach an audience and publishers for indie devs (like us).

Here’s a trailer for the IAB, :

Great trailer full of great games!

Hope to “see” you there! Till then, jump on our Discord for some virtual hanging out as well!

Modelling the “Scientific Method” for our RPG

Modelling the “Scientific Method” for our RPG

We think of our game as an RPG but with no combat. So is everything a fetch quest? Or is it just a cleverly disguised point-and-click adventure? Hopefully, neither. We’ve developed a gameplay mechanic that we haven’t really seen developed elsewhere (at least not to this extent) and we think it’s one of the biggest innovations in our game… It is the “Reporting mechanic” or the “Scientific method mechanic” (however you want to call it). It consists of getting clues from various sources (dialogues with animals, books from libraries, evidence from locations et cetera), and then combining them in a way that forms a coherent argument. These clues+conclusions are sent as reports and published in the Kingdom’s newspapers and then reviewed by your peers for, hopefully, some scholarly reputation.

This mechanic fits well with the themes of our game which focus heavily on the science landscape of the Animal Kingdom and also the factions you can support in the brewing civil war and their worldviews.

So how does it work?

You collect clues as mentioned above and then choose which to include in your report. If certain clues are strung together, certain conclusions will pop out (or not), to be added in the report as well (or not), as seen here in this textual mock-up:

Charles trying to solve the Burrows Epidemic – the report itself is in the upper left, the possible conclusions are in the lower left, and all the clues he found are on the right

There are many but not infinitely many conclusions, so some clue combinations are just dead ends (for example combining the eating habbits of the rabbits with the history of King Vincent is not going to yield any conclusion). However, not all the conclusions are equally valid – some will give you a lot of scientific (or factional) reputation, and some will make you infamous. For example, citing from a source deemed disreputable by the academic community (a known fraud, for example) will get you negative scientific reputation, but using it to bolster a democratic worldview will nevertheless get you some reputation among that faction (and negative reputation from other factions). This will all be done behind the scenes and slowly over time so as to discourage players from treating the game as a score system, which breaks immersion and isn’t really the point (whether your reputation is high or low isn’t that big of an issue in terms of questing. It just changes certain options and the way people of certain factions or backgrounds treat you).

The sources also depend on the style of gameplay you prefer – do you often take the words of local animals (dialogue-heavy) or do you do your research by standing on the shoulders of giants (library-heavy with a lot of sifting through clues) or maybe you are more of a sherlockian detective diving deep in the case with evidence and using scientific equipment wherever you can (photograph, microscope, et cetera)?

https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/646000092385378304/733682458473791588/2m.jpg
Anyway, we received word that the UI was a bit too block-of-texty, so we decided to add a visual UI right besides the textual one, seen in this mockup here with icons instead of texts. Notice the tab “Textual | Visual” to switch between the two.

While the game is mostly agnostic to the “reality” of your research, and you can write your own conclusions on whether a certain king was historically great or terrible, sometimes the game does actually have the “right” solution (e.g. in the Burrows epidemic – something actually does cure the rabbits, and something else doesn’t). However, sometimes completely different paths can lead to similar conclusions (do the rabbits need to use activated charcoal due to the fact that they have gastric stasis, or because they got sick from using the new carbide lamps?), and both can’t be correct, but you’re going to publish and cure some rabbits anyway so – whatever! Just make sure you don’t conclude that they need to drink cyanide, that would be bad.

In terms of gameplay, an important thing to note is the “peer review” system. As mentioned above, there are ways to gain and lose reputation by publishing your reports and solving quests – the reports are published in the Kingdom’s papers and then there are other scholars who review your report and write short texts about you, which you can read in the next issue of the paper. These are combined from a pre-set large base of possible sentences and are a combination of flavor and hints to the player on what he did wrong according to these peers (as you can always re-publish with new evidence). An example would be a report on wildly coloured funghi in the colony where you write about how they are much more colourful than the ones in Kingdom Proper, but don’t really add photos to prove it so it’s just your word they have to trust. Also, let us say that you’ve been leaning heavily towards a monarchist stance in your historical reports so the more monarchy-inclined scholars will be more inclined to keep your back . Then perhaps you’d have this situation in the papers:

“Joccobano Rabbitese writes: This royalist drivel calls itself science? There aren’t even any photos! The masks are finally off and we see what is behind the hedge!”

“Greguri Claw writes: Charles did a splendid piece. The whole thing is spot on. Of course the son of Herbert never disappoints! I only wish there were more photos.”

Or, alternatively, with less important reports, we just give the player a summary as thus:
“The consensus reads: Charles has some solid points, but the lack of evidence is jarring. Also, it would benefit his scholarly writing if he didn’t meander so much.”

Of course this is mostly still a discussion on paper. However the prototyping (and later testing) of these ideas in the digital world is going slowly but surely, as can be seen by this picture here, using Godot Engine:

Godot Engine comes with nodes such as GraphEdit and GraphNode which are really useful for complex graph-based UI so it’s making our lives easier.

As you can see, the clues will be separated into tabs (there won’t be a Red Herring Tab, don’t worry), and thus easily searchable not only by source (book, person, location) but also by theme (medical, chemistry, timeline, et cetera – depending on the quest in question).

We hope this mechanic will be interesting to play and figure out, and we have a hunch that the best moments will come from outside-the-box thinking such as using clues from some old quest to help nail down a crucial conclusion in a later seemingly unrelated quest.

So let us know what you think of where we are right now in terms of gameplay UI and the reporting mechanic in general!

Art in our Art: an Interview with Jurica Pusenjak

Our game will feature paintings from acclaimed Croatian young artists. For example, when you enter Orville’s mansion, he has pictures hanging on his walls, from some of our finest fine artists (pun very much intended) as seen here:

Orville’s mansion features artwork from some of the best young Croatian painters – Tara Beata Racz and Luka Kusevic.

So let’s talk to the first one of them – Jurica Pusenjak. Who is he? Well, Jurica Pušenjak was born in September 13 of 1996 in Zagreb. After finishing the School of Applied Arts and Design in Zagreb in 2015 he enrolled in the Academy of Fine Arts in Zagreb, where he is currently finishing his master’s year in the class of Zoltan Novak.

jurica pušenjak – NACIONAL.HR
Some picture we found online of Jurica Pusenjak in his element.

During his studies, he was awarded two Dean awards and one Rector award for a large scientific-artistic group work. From 2018 onward he is active in a series of exhibitions including the 5th Biennale of Painting in HDLU, co-authoring and exhibiting in the “Tartaglias Shelves” exhibition in the Forum Gallery and “They Are Leaving” in the HAZU Glyptotheque.

We talked to him about his work on Trip the Ark Fantastic art.

What are your interests in painting?

JP: I am interested in painting itself – its possibilities and its limitations… What enthralls me the most in art is the expression through painting. The same thing can be expressed in a myriad different ways. It’s beautiful!

How do you envision the eagle you painted, Coriolanus?

Coriolanus in flight, Jurica Pusenjak, painted on wood

JP: Coriolanus is a revolutionary leading the people to a new era. This is the narrative of his character and that is how I painted him – as a revolutionary!

I can connect this to my own work easily – you see, apart from art, I am interested in the revolution. I keep fantasizing about some anonymous showing up with a message that will change the world.

The first artwork you see is the young eagle in his full strength soaring high in the sky. The ideas of revolution are sparking within him but he still doesn’t know how to ignite them…

And this one?

https://cdn.discordapp.com/attachments/619813078636429322/720316177745838172/104087392_3024895807590387_7115173615101284400_n.png
Oil on canvas

JP: The same eagle is now more mature, stronger, like a real revolutionary. We can see the artistic influences of Russian socialist realism as well as Nazi-Kunst, which are on the formal level identical, and held together by the idea of art in service of the regime.

What else are you cooking?

JP: There is the project I’m currently working on, an exhibition called “Heroes” where I will exhibit my portraits of around 1300 war heroes of Yugoslavia.

NFOTO - Jurica Pušenjak
Some of the 1300 heroes in many different art styles – in a way, it’s a monument to the heroes and to art itself.

What drew you to work with us on Trip the Ark Fantastic?

JP: The collaboration was exciting perhaps because I have spent my childhood in the late 90s playing similar games, those were point-and-click classics such as Grim Fandango, Monkey Island, Blade Runner, Sanitarium, Broken Sword… I am curiously happy that this genre still persists. I would love to work on this project some more!

Thanks, Jurica Pušenjak! And thanks dear readers! Till next time, make sure to follow us on our various channels, or subscribe to our newsletter, or whatever tickles your fancy!

Inspirations for Revolutionaries?

One of the factions (read that link first, it’s important to get it) in our game is very revolutionary – they seek to change the world radically and if necessary (and it always is necessary!) by force. So we’re in a conundrum as to which revolutionary sentiment to ascribe to this faction. The three famous modern revolutions in the west are of course possible starting points for inspirations:

  1. The American Revolution – the earliest of the three. Led by puritans, scholars, and various intellectuals adored by the American masses. They waged a short and precise war followed by a long restructuring. Their goal? “A republic, if you can keep it”. Probably a bit too clean for our anarchists, though.
  2. The French Revolution – very bloody, at start filled with idealists who are egalitarian in nature but in time resulting in chaos with many ill-fated experiments, very volatile and often portrayed as morally grey in subsequent mainstream history. Indeed very good for what we want.
  3. The Russian (October) Revolution – the events in Petrograd had similiarities to our own factions, as Petrograd had all three factions that our game has as well: the Tzarists (our Royalists), the Cadets (our Reformists), and the Bolsheviks (our Revolutionaries).

It is also of great importance to us to clearly define the differences between the Reformists and Revolutionaries, so as not to confuse the player. Here, the Russian Revolution holds some great and easy to understand definitions, when comparing the Cadets (who wish to perform a political revolution, similar to our Reformists), and the Bolsheviks (who wish to change industrial relations in society), as seen in Ten Days That Shook the World by Herbert Reed:

“The propertied classes wanted merely a political revolution, which would take the power from the Tsar and give it to them. They wanted Russia to be a constitutional Republic, like France or the United States; or a constitutional Monarchy, like England. On the other hand, the masses of the people wanted real industrial and agrarian democracy.”

In trying to figure out the motivations and characteristics of our revolutionaries, we’ve also spent some time researching terrorist organisations (but hopefully we didn’t get on any government watchlists). These include the famous RAF, Rote Zora, Weather Underground, and so on. The common denominators are that all of them are usually a very loosely based fringe group that quickly dissipates in both their ideology (which eventually makes a sharp turn from systemic views on certain problems towards specific conspiracy theories and personal agendas). This didn’t sit well with what we wanted to achieve with our revolutionary faction (an interesting, cohesive ideology that challenges the players worldview as much as the other factions, regarding both the role of power in society and the consequences of its concentration in the elite handful).

Not to spend too much time on this today, we’d actually like to hear your opinions, so please drop us a message here or on our Discord server where we usually dwell.

Gamechuck is looking for a Godot programmer!

Gamechuck is looking for a Godot programmer!

Today we are posting this short blog/announcement because we are hiring! Gamechuck is in a need for an extra Godot programmer.

If you like what we do programmatically and are open-source oriented, check out the call:

Gamechuck is hiring a Godot programmer

Ideally you would be Croatian or willing to come to Zagreb so we can hang out in the office (that is why the ad is in Croatian actually).

If you are interested, send us a mail at info@game-chuck.com and be sure to check out our About page there as well.

While you’re updating your application form, check out our Godot Engine-oriented blog posts below.

No Working Sundays in the Animal Kingdom (All Hail King Lav!)

King’s Rest

There’s a lot of talk these days in our country (Croatia) about making Sunday an obligatory holiday, pros and cons, etc… This reminded us of this little piece of lore that’s been lying in Nuclino for a while, called “King’s Rest”, as part of our calendar series, so let’s share it:

As part of his efforts in modernising the Kingdom to be in touch with the changing structure of society (from the mostly agricultural to an industrial one), King Leonard the Wise introduced a law guaranteeing a day off to every working animal, so that all animals may have the time to enjoy arts and sciences.

In today's Ark Lore Tuesday, we talk about King's Rest, a non-working day during the week, that we, earthlings know as Sunday.
No exploration and adventure today, boys. It’s Sunday!

This was a formalization of an existing norm for farmers of the market day, in which farmers went to the markets to sell things, and other animals bought the items, as was similar in many regions of our world as well (see Nundinae for example).

However, codifying this in law made sense to Leonard as the exact day in the week wasn’t unified across the Kingdom before the introduction of the King’s Rest (the northern Lynx-held regions had Midday Markets on the third day of the week, and so on) . This made organisation of commerce and general trade easier and also allowed animals to all have a common day of socialising with each other (resulting in the 1820 “cub boom” among other things).

The unified free day was also benificial in the creation of the Kingdom’s first worker’s unions, as many professions needed a day when they could all meet and organise that was outside the watchful eye of certain workplace cadres, being a thorn in the side of several industry leaders. Even so, the obligatory day off remained even after Leonard’s reign, the King’s Rest law was renamed to Lionday, and has remained in place in both the reigns of Leopold and King Lav.

In today's Ark Lore Tuesday, we talk about King's Rest, a non-working day during the week, that we, earthlings know as Sunday.
What do you mean, you need to send the postcard to your grandmother, Carl? It’s Sunday!

Lest you think we’re just making these things up out of boredom, actually – aside from botany, history and chemistry, Charles will also dabble in Kingdom law. One of the side-quests in the game will have the player dive deep into the minutiae of the Kingdom’s legal system to try and figure out a situation regarding the non-implementation of Lionsday in a certain coal mine. Here’s what happens to start off the quest (no spoilers, don’t worry):

As seen in a by-law regarding Lionsday – “during times of distress or hardship, in order to preserve the smooth operation of certain industries, the King’s Rest may be waived by local administrators for a limited time.

Yeah, we may have a disease going on, but it’s Sunday, Charles, so screw it.

This waiver may not extend beyond the period of distress, and should be duly compensated as a regular workday.” Of course, this becomes a point of contention between the workforce and the bureau, and Charles has to use his skills as a bylaw-interpreting-hedgehog to help one side out.

Sure, jump on our Discord and tell us all about what you think of work-free Sundays or whatnot.

Art re-evaluation time!

We’ve been working full-time on Trip the Ark Fantastic for almost a year now! It’s a large undertaking for a small indie developer such as us so we decided very early on we’d like to find a publisher to help us out. For this reason, we’ve been sending our Trip the Ark Fantastic brochure to a lot of publishers these past months.

The good news here is that literally everybody loves the idea of the game. We sent the brochure to almost 30 publishers and everybody was enticed by the atmosphere, themes and gameplay decisions!

Continue reading “Art re-evaluation time!”

How we made a plan for development: GDDs, techdocs, charts and more…

How we made a plan for development: GDDs, techdocs, charts and more…

Hi, it’s me again, Alex. Last week I wrote about the short history of our company and our other cool stuff we’re cooking that’s not Trip the Ark Fantastic.

This week I’m going to explain the process of planning we had prior to starting on the development of Trip the Ark Fantastic. There’s a lot of game developers who just dive in (myself included on numerous occasions) but for this project, we decided to really figure everything out prior to starting, including making GDDs, Tech Docs, Gantt charts, etc. That’s not to say we carved everything in stone, we’re still having a lot of discussions, even very fundamental ones, but at least we have a good starting cornerstone.

And since we’ve had great success with previous blogs that deal with gamedev methodology, such as the one where we discuss our asset pipeline or how we write dialogues for the game, this time we’ll write up a blog about our project methodology, how we made a plan, and hopefully some people will find it interesting! So, let’s start.

Before the flood, there was a GDD!

First off, even before we started working on the project, we made a huge GDD with all our ideas, and it was over 50 pages long and created collaboratively by Piet and me:

The process of making a plan we had prior to starting on the development of Trip the Ark Fantastic.
20.000 words of design decisions, gameplay mechanics, lore, quests etc.

This was important so that we can figure out more-or-less exactly the scope of the project even before starting it.

The next step was deciding on the art style we want. Of course, an art director would be great for this, but having none yet, we decided that we’re going to have to decide this ourselves for now. So we made another document, quite huge and pin-pointed a lot of different styles that could work, and finally decided on one to start off with.

The process of making a plan we had prior to starting on the development of Trip the Ark Fantastic.
Some of the more obscure styles we considered. Yes, very thorough.

We then settled on a fantasy-ish 2D cartoon-animated art style and found someone to make a few key artworks which we added into the new and shortened GDD, available here:

This GDD was what we sent to the Creative Europe grant (which we received) and also to our investors, prior to their investment. And then, it was time to decide on the scope of the team. Do we need a specialised composer full time or will a freelancer work? Do we need 2, 3 or 4 artists working on the visuals? How about programmers? Et cetera. So, for this, we started creating specialised documents that nail down each of these things.

Making a plan: Creating a Technical Design Document

There was the Technical Design Document where we decided on how to approach certain technical issues arising from our new mechanics (will we use SQLite for storing data, or our own search with data in JSON, what format we’ll store the game script in, et cetera). It looked a bit like this:

The process of making a plan we had prior to starting on the development of Trip the Ark Fantastic.
24 pages of this stuff. Yay, fun.

There was also a lot of other documents, including a “music design document”. Of course, this document was revised once we found the right composer, but it helped to show the potential composers what we want in terms of musical style and complexity.

Lots of weird graphs and charts in that one.

And then, after all that was done (cca mid 2019), we started gathering the team to work on the game. It took us most of 2019 but we finally found some great artists, the last of which was our character artist Serena whose first blog was about the awesome tool Krita that she uses for character design.

After the whole team was finalised, we reworked a lot of the documents (now with more realistic timesheets and expectations, especially regarding music and art), and then created a nice big 2 year plan for the development of the game, in the form of a timesheet:

We should update it for July. At some point.

This way we figured the earliest possible release-date for the game to be in 2022 (that’s why it’s called a 2 year plan!) and then when we knew everything about the game and had the whole team on board we proceeded to create a teaser trailer to showcase the atmosphere of the game and drive people to our website where they can read more about the game and follow our work (including reading these blog posts of course).

If you haven’t seen it, here’s the trailer!

And then we started working full time on the game proper, starting with making a playable demo of the first city in the game – art, story, music et cetera. The city quest was reworked a bit to feature the main mechanic already (we wanted to introduce it later but decided that for showcasing purposes earlier is better). And that’s where we’re at now.

The various documents have been replaced by more awesome tools (like Nuclino for world building) and/or more detailed charts and sheets for art and music deliverables.

Hopefully, we won’t miss our internal deadline too much (or maybe hopefully we will and the game will be 10x better for it?) but in any case, this is the long and winding road we took to ensure we know what we’re doing and we don’t enter some kind of unforeseen development hell, as none of us are really senior experts in gamedev.

And that’s it. Hopefully some of these ideas have inspired you to plan ahead for your own game! If you have any questions or would like to see some of these documents irl, ping us via social media or join our Discord!